mamaandherbabybyrd:

fuckyeahmumblrs:

10 True Things About the First Year of Parenthood
I did a ridiculous amount of reading when I was pregnant. I read natural parenting books and baby scheduling books and how to make your baby happy with no crying and eating is good for everyone led by the spirit of “your baby, yourself” books. If there was a book to read, rest assured, I gave it a go. I thought I knew everything I’d need to know.
How much of that information did I actually use? Some. A little. The best bits of this, a quick trick from that, but no single book was spot-on accurate, and nothing was anywhere near as easy as all my reading had led me to believe. Fable was just herself, and apparently, she hadn’t been reading the same stuff I’d been bingeing on. All that reading was mostly a waste of time.*
These are the words I wish I’d read instead, before jumping headlong into the mommyhood with my books and my charts and my ideals and my high horses. They’re flawed, and they aren’t all pretty, but they’re hard-won and honest and as true as I can get ‘em.
Here’s what I wish I’d known:
1. You are going to suck at this parenting gig and be awesome at it at the same time, all the time. You will be a different parent every morning to a child who will also be different, sometimes changing in just hours, or minutes, or before your eyes. There will be good days and bad days, good minutes and bad minutes, good choices and not-so-good ones. You will do some things, probably a lot of things, wrong. Be gentle with yourself, because you are wildly loved and incredibly needed. You are climbing Mt. Everest with basically zero conditioning — expect to be kind of terrible at it for a while. You are beautiful. We are for you.
2. Postpartum bodies are squashy and wobbly and dimpled and stretched and foreign and embarrassing and difficult and painful and gorgeously imperfect, and they tend to stay that way for quite awhile. You made a human. Now make your peace. Eat good food. Walk around when you’re well enough. Listen to the people who tell you you’re beautiful. Take them at their word. Remember where your worth comes from.
3. Your baby is not like the other babies.  Your baby is the only one of herself who has ever been, and you and your partner are the only experts on her. Your baby will not behave like the books say, won’t like what she’s supposed to like, won’t do what she’s supposed to do when she’s supposed to do it, and that’s normal and great and perfectly OK. The best thing you can do is put down your literature and get to know your baby. What does she like? What makes her laugh? How does she best fall asleep? What does hungry sound like? The discovery of these things will serve you so much more than any stranger’s care instructions ever will. You don’t have to make your life or your family look like any particular model — you don’t have to follow the rules. You just have to create a life that works for you and fosters love and security and a whole lot of laughter. If that looks like 2 a.m. pancake parties, I’m not going to tell on you. I might actually admire you and be just a little bit jealous.
4. We have got to stop telling people that things should be easy and painless.  We live in a culture that equates ease with value — the easier it is, the better it is; if it hurts you, something is wrong. Reality check: sometimes things that are hard and painful are also really, really good. Every once in a while as a parent, one of the things that you thought would be really difficult turns out to be incredibly easy and drama-free. This is called a miracle, and though it might be somehow related to some book you read and the alignment of the stars and a magic way you pat the soles of your baby’s feet and the tea you drink on Thursdays, it’s still mostly a miracle, and the odds of that same miracle happening to EVERY OTHER PARENT EVERYWHERE are pretty slim, even with books and stars and tea and so much foot-patting. We get excited in our victories, and want to share them, but it’s important to remember that we are all struggling with different issues. One daddy’s easy is some mama’s nightmare. And just because your baby doesn’t sleep through the night at five weeks or eat with a fork by her first birthday or cries a lot or your boobs get sore from breastfeeding (even though her latch is perfect) — just because it isn’t EASY and PAINLESS — it isn’t necessarily wrong. Sometimes hard is OK, sometimes, often, it’s even good. Hard is how we grow. And guess what, kiddo — parenting is hard. Any book that tells you otherwise deserves the big fat sticker of bullshit.
5. Speaking of bullshit, oh mylanta, the poop.  They warn you. They tell you. And despite every warning, it is still baffling and alarming and downright awe-inspiring how much of your next year is going to be spent dealing with, assessing, smelling for, washing off, evaluating, discussing, logging and transporting poop. Get good and comfy with poop, friends. The poop cometh. For whom the poop tolls. The hunt for poop-tober — you get the idea.
6. The sooner you can figure out how to accept unwanted advice gracefully, the easier your year is going to be. For whatever reason, people love to weigh in on babies — everyone has an opinion, and everyone wants to share. I believe that most of this advice is pretty well-intended — most of it falls into the “it worked for me and I am so happy and I want to share my joy joy joy with you because you look very tired” category, which is at least only mildly offensive and really very sincere.
Here’s the thing — you can stumble through this crazy first 12 months in defense mode, snapping witty comebacks at judgmental old ladies or know-it-all childless people, or you can decide to give everybody the benefit of the doubt, smile and say thank you, and become very zen and confident about knowing what’s best for your child and not giving one ounce of your abundance of poop about what anyone else says.
If I were you, I’d aim for zen.
Nobody is out to get you. Everyone wants you to succeed. And screw them all anyway, because you are raising a child, and that is awesome. Did your kid eat something today? Is she relatively hygienically sound? Smiles occasionally? You win all the things. You are awesome enough to absorb any and all commentary, keep the bits you like, and toss the bits you don’t. How sweet of them to care.
7. Start stretching, because it’s time to get flexible.  I’m not a big fan of general statements like “All babies like swaddling,” or “Co-sleeping is best for everybody,” but there is one I can get behind — babies are really inconvenient. Your schedule, your sleep, your stellar punctuality record, your deadlines, your best shirts, your relationships — everything is about to get messy and complicated. You have two choices: become a cweepinghungrytiredmess of doom, or swallow every ounce of pride you have and become flexible. Ask for help. Admit failure. Be late. Stay in your pajamas. Ignore the dishes. Let slide what can slide and rejoice when you make it through with all your bare necessities intact. You are going to miss a few parties and a lot of snoozes and probably many other important things, and it will be OK. It will be better than OK. It will be amazing.
Maybe, just maybe, you’ll be one of those parents who gets a magic baby who responds to the methods in whatever book you read or is just naturally benevolent and fits like a glove into your fabulous and organized life. Again, this is called a miracle. We love you and are happy for you. Now please, shut up.
8. The most important thing to get for your baby is not a Rock n’ Play, nor a good set of swaddling blankets, nor a high-end stroller. The most important thing to get for your baby is a village. Your village will keep you afloat. They will carry you when you are tired, feed you when you are starving, forgive you when you are unkempt and hours late and a neglectful friend who can’t remember to wear socks let alone whose birthday it is. They will love your baby when you are too tired or frustrated to hold her at the moment, because you are imperfect and human and have imperfect and human failings. They will remind you who you are when you start to think your whole life is only about poop. They will lift you up.
9. We have to lift each other up.  Raising babies is the hardest thing many of us have ever done. We can tear each other to bits, criticize choices and turn up noses, or we can love each other, admire adorable babies, offer a hand and celebrate victories. This is not a difficult choice, people. Nobody cares that your way is better. Everyone cares that your kid is gorgeous and let’s chat over coffee and what have you been doing with your hair lately because, girlfriend, you look fabulous. Don’t be horrible. It isn’t really that hard.
10. Success is found in being willing to grow.  Here’s the truth: you don’t know much of anything. A year from now, after your fantastic kid turns 1, you won’t know much of anything still. Gather wisdom around you. Learn from your mistakes. Stay humble. Stay open. When you know better, do better. Be a better parent tomorrow than you were today, always, everyday, as often as you can. Try things out and leave them behind shamelessly if they don’t work out. Life isn’t a contest or a game — it’s simply only beautifully life. Live the minutes instead of scoring them. Love that incredible baby.
Oh, lovely — you are going to have so much fun!
___________________________________________________
One of my family members shared on Facebook and I felt compelled to share it here with you all as well. Love it <3 -B

And I would say that a good bit of the mumblr community needs to study #9 a bit more. Just read this to yourself multiple times ladies. We should be supporting, not bashing eachother.
“9. We have to lift each other up.  Raising babies is the hardest thing many of us have ever done. We can tear each other to bits, criticize choices and turn up noses, or we can love each other, admire adorable babies, offer a hand and celebrate victories. This is not a difficult choice, people. Nobody cares that your way is better. Everyone cares that your kid is gorgeous and let’s chat over coffee and what have you been doing with your hair lately because, girlfriend, you look fabulous. Don’t be horrible. It isn’t really that hard.”

mamaandherbabybyrd:

fuckyeahmumblrs:

10 True Things About the First Year of Parenthood

I did a ridiculous amount of reading when I was pregnant. I read natural parenting books and baby scheduling books and how to make your baby happy with no crying and eating is good for everyone led by the spirit of “your baby, yourself” books. If there was a book to read, rest assured, I gave it a go.

I thought I knew everything I’d need to know.

How much of that information did I actually use? Some. A little. The best bits of this, a quick trick from that, but no single book was spot-on accurate, and nothing was anywhere near as easy as all my reading had led me to believe. Fable was just herself, and apparently, she hadn’t been reading the same stuff I’d been bingeing on. All that reading was mostly a waste of time.*

These are the words I wish I’d read instead, before jumping headlong into the mommyhood with my books and my charts and my ideals and my high horses. They’re flawed, and they aren’t all pretty, but they’re hard-won and honest and as true as I can get ‘em.

Here’s what I wish I’d known:

1. You are going to suck at this parenting gig and be awesome at it at the same time, all the time. You will be a different parent every morning to a child who will also be different, sometimes changing in just hours, or minutes, or before your eyes. There will be good days and bad days, good minutes and bad minutes, good choices and not-so-good ones. You will do some things, probably a lot of things, wrong. Be gentle with yourself, because you are wildly loved and incredibly needed. You are climbing Mt. Everest with basically zero conditioning — expect to be kind of terrible at it for a while. You are beautiful. We are for you.

2. Postpartum bodies are squashy and wobbly and dimpled and stretched and foreign and embarrassing and difficult and painful and gorgeously imperfect, and they tend to stay that way for quite awhile. You made a human. Now make your peace. Eat good food. Walk around when you’re well enough. Listen to the people who tell you you’re beautiful. Take them at their word. Remember where your worth comes from.

3. Your baby is not like the other babies. Your baby is the only one of herself who has ever been, and you and your partner are the only experts on her. Your baby will not behave like the books say, won’t like what she’s supposed to like, won’t do what she’s supposed to do when she’s supposed to do it, and that’s normal and great and perfectly OK. The best thing you can do is put down your literature and get to know your baby. What does she like? What makes her laugh? How does she best fall asleep? What does hungry sound like? The discovery of these things will serve you so much more than any stranger’s care instructions ever will. You don’t have to make your life or your family look like any particular model — you don’t have to follow the rules. You just have to create a life that works for you and fosters love and security and a whole lot of laughter. If that looks like 2 a.m. pancake parties, I’m not going to tell on you. I might actually admire you and be just a little bit jealous.

4. We have got to stop telling people that things should be easy and painless. We live in a culture that equates ease with value — the easier it is, the better it is; if it hurts you, something is wrong. Reality check: sometimes things that are hard and painful are also really, really good. Every once in a while as a parent, one of the things that you thought would be really difficult turns out to be incredibly easy and drama-free. This is called a miracle, and though it might be somehow related to some book you read and the alignment of the stars and a magic way you pat the soles of your baby’s feet and the tea you drink on Thursdays, it’s still mostly a miracle, and the odds of that same miracle happening to EVERY OTHER PARENT EVERYWHERE are pretty slim, even with books and stars and tea and so much foot-patting. We get excited in our victories, and want to share them, but it’s important to remember that we are all struggling with different issues. One daddy’s easy is some mama’s nightmare. And just because your baby doesn’t sleep through the night at five weeks or eat with a fork by her first birthday or cries a lot or your boobs get sore from breastfeeding (even though her latch is perfect) — just because it isn’t EASY and PAINLESS — it isn’t necessarily wrong. Sometimes hard is OK, sometimes, often, it’s even good. Hard is how we grow. And guess what, kiddo — parenting is hard. Any book that tells you otherwise deserves the big fat sticker of bullshit.

5. Speaking of bullshit, oh mylanta, the poop. They warn you. They tell you. And despite every warning, it is still baffling and alarming and downright awe-inspiring how much of your next year is going to be spent dealing with, assessing, smelling for, washing off, evaluating, discussing, logging and transporting poop. Get good and comfy with poop, friends. The poop cometh. For whom the poop tolls. The hunt for poop-tober — you get the idea.

6. The sooner you can figure out how to accept unwanted advice gracefully, the easier your year is going to be. For whatever reason, people love to weigh in on babies — everyone has an opinion, and everyone wants to share. I believe that most of this advice is pretty well-intended — most of it falls into the “it worked for me and I am so happy and I want to share my joy joy joy with you because you look very tired” category, which is at least only mildly offensive and really very sincere.

Here’s the thing — you can stumble through this crazy first 12 months in defense mode, snapping witty comebacks at judgmental old ladies or know-it-all childless people, or you can decide to give everybody the benefit of the doubt, smile and say thank you, and become very zen and confident about knowing what’s best for your child and not giving one ounce of your abundance of poop about what anyone else says.

If I were you, I’d aim for zen.

Nobody is out to get you. Everyone wants you to succeed. And screw them all anyway, because you are raising a child, and that is awesome. Did your kid eat something today? Is she relatively hygienically sound? Smiles occasionally? You win all the things. You are awesome enough to absorb any and all commentary, keep the bits you like, and toss the bits you don’t. How sweet of them to care.

7. Start stretching, because it’s time to get flexible. I’m not a big fan of general statements like “All babies like swaddling,” or “Co-sleeping is best for everybody,” but there is one I can get behind — babies are really inconvenient. Your schedule, your sleep, your stellar punctuality record, your deadlines, your best shirts, your relationships — everything is about to get messy and complicated. You have two choices: become a cweepinghungrytiredmess of doom, or swallow every ounce of pride you have and become flexible. Ask for help. Admit failure. Be late. Stay in your pajamas. Ignore the dishes. Let slide what can slide and rejoice when you make it through with all your bare necessities intact. You are going to miss a few parties and a lot of snoozes and probably many other important things, and it will be OK. It will be better than OK. It will be amazing.

Maybe, just maybe, you’ll be one of those parents who gets a magic baby who responds to the methods in whatever book you read or is just naturally benevolent and fits like a glove into your fabulous and organized life. Again, this is called a miracle. We love you and are happy for you. Now please, shut up.

8. The most important thing to get for your baby is not a Rock n’ Play, nor a good set of swaddling blankets, nor a high-end stroller. The most important thing to get for your baby is a village. Your village will keep you afloat. They will carry you when you are tired, feed you when you are starving, forgive you when you are unkempt and hours late and a neglectful friend who can’t remember to wear socks let alone whose birthday it is. They will love your baby when you are too tired or frustrated to hold her at the moment, because you are imperfect and human and have imperfect and human failings. They will remind you who you are when you start to think your whole life is only about poop. They will lift you up.

9. We have to lift each other up. Raising babies is the hardest thing many of us have ever done. We can tear each other to bits, criticize choices and turn up noses, or we can love each other, admire adorable babies, offer a hand and celebrate victories. This is not a difficult choice, people. Nobody cares that your way is better. Everyone cares that your kid is gorgeous and let’s chat over coffee and what have you been doing with your hair lately because, girlfriend, you look fabulous. Don’t be horrible. It isn’t really that hard.

10. Success is found in being willing to grow. Here’s the truth: you don’t know much of anything. A year from now, after your fantastic kid turns 1, you won’t know much of anything still. Gather wisdom around you. Learn from your mistakes. Stay humble. Stay open. When you know better, do better. Be a better parent tomorrow than you were today, always, everyday, as often as you can. Try things out and leave them behind shamelessly if they don’t work out. Life isn’t a contest or a game — it’s simply only beautifully life. Live the minutes instead of scoring them. Love that incredible baby.

Oh, lovely — you are going to have so much fun!

___________________________________________________

One of my family members shared on Facebook and I felt compelled to share it here with you all as well. Love it <3 -B

And I would say that a good bit of the mumblr community needs to study #9 a bit more. Just read this to yourself multiple times ladies. We should be supporting, not bashing eachother.

9. We have to lift each other up. Raising babies is the hardest thing many of us have ever done. We can tear each other to bits, criticize choices and turn up noses, or we can love each other, admire adorable babies, offer a hand and celebrate victories. This is not a difficult choice, people. Nobody cares that your way is better. Everyone cares that your kid is gorgeous and let’s chat over coffee and what have you been doing with your hair lately because, girlfriend, you look fabulous. Don’t be horrible. It isn’t really that hard.”

Forbes Living TV Reports on Bad Foods for Good Pets

Think first before tossing your four-legged pooch or kitty a treat from your plate. There are many foods that are bad for them and can cause extreme illness or even death. Forbes Living TV chronicles the bad foods for good pets.

Onions and garlic

The enzymes in these foods can cause major gastrointestinal problems for pets. If the family fur baby has eaten either one look out for vomiting, shortness of breath, weakness and loss of appetite.

Grapes and Raisins

These two foods in small amounts can make a pet quite ill with non-stop vomiting, exhaustion and even depression. Larger amounts can cause kidney failure. Avoid tossing grapes and raisins into a dog or cat’s mouth, even if they want one.

Raw eggs, meat and fish

Cats love fish and dogs love eggs and meat. But uncooked foods could be contaminated with salmonella and E. coli which can really upset tummy’s smaller than ours. Call the vet if the animal is vomiting, has a fever or enlarged lymph nodes.

Fat and bones

Fat trimmings cause ferocious stomach upsets, blood and the stool and diarrhea. Bones which have been chewed can cause splinters in the gums and mouth and later get stuck in the digestive system. Keep this in mind from Thanksgiving to New Year’s Day.

Dairy

Dogs and cats cannot stomach the lactose in milk and dairy products. Don’t give them any cheese, cream or other dairy products. It can give them diarrhea which makes them weak and dehydrated.

Forbes Living TV encourages readers to be especially alert this holiday season from Halloween on to keep candy and food like the above away from pets.

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Forbes Living and How to Enjoy a Flight of Any Length

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(avoid eating this before a flight)

There are hundreds of websites which offer travel tips. Very few of them will think of the small and pertinent reminders that we often forget. Forbes Living shares some useful travel tips so everyone can enjoy a flight of any length.

There are some foods and beverages that do not sit well in the body during flights of any length. To ensure a comfortable flight, avoid these if at all possible: soda, beans, garlic, hamburgers and cheeseburgers. It is always a good idea to not eat or drink anything that can cause flatulence or eat anything that takes a long time to digest such as red meat. Garlic not only causes bad breath but its strong smell can leak through pores. Also good to avoid are foods which are salty because it results in bloating and swollen ankles.  Take a snack with you like bananas, pretzels or protein bars. Grab a large bottle of water after passing through security. Forbes Living TV also recommends taking these important items with you in an under the seat bag: extra undergarments, two pairs of socks, a spare lightweight shirt, medication, small toiletries, charger cords for electronics, reading material, a lightweight blanket or shawl, and paper copies of travel itinerary and flighty schedules. While many people put faith in their digital devices to keep confirmations, there is nothing as reassuring as having a paper back up in case the device runs out of battery life. Be prepared for travel this fall with these tips from the Forbes Living TV show. 

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It Is National Coffee Day Everyday at Forbes Living

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Today is National Coffee Day and there are a few major name-brand businesses offering free cups of java today. We assume you know where they are. Of course, there are those who believe that there are better ways to start the day than a nice, hot cup of rich, flavorful coffee freshly made and waiting. Forbes Living TV does not agree.

There is some questionable research published which states that people who drink caffeinated drinks in the morning need caffeine all day in order to function. There is another report which states that there are better ways to become alert and stay alert than consuming any caffeinated beverage.

Some people can get up early and exercise which can increase energy and help boost alertness. Other feel that eating a healthy breakfast which may include herbal tea is a better way to get the day started and stay on track all day. Short naps in the middle of the day can also boost energy and alertness. Forbes Living TV would be remiss to not mention that coffee lovers don’t just drink a cup in the morning to wake up. They drink it because they like the flavor, they appreciate its antioxidant values and its richness.  Drinking coffee in the morning does not make the java aficionado feel sluggish in the afternoon. In fact, it makes them feel empowered to master the day ahead. If they happen to want (not need) a cup of coffee later in the day, it’s simply a matter of taste. Pardon us now while we slip out for a quick, free cup of our favorite brew on this National Coffee Day. 

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Tips to Save on Pet Care Costs from Forbes Living

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Anyone who owns a pet or is owned by a pet can attest to how expensive pet care can be. Forbes Living shares some tips on how to save on healthcare and other items from the family four-legger.

Pet insurance is one way to cut costs on routine visits to the vet and even on injuries. There are several companies which offer it. Read everything you can about what the policy covers and how much of a premium you have to pay.

Buy food, treats, cat litter and other essentials in bulk at discount stores. Most major retailers sell the name brand food. There are online outlets for buying food, treats, toys and litter in bulk also. Use coupons and coupon codes to get the most savings.

Cats can be groomed at home. All it takes it patience, a sturdy towel and the right tools and kitty beauty time is manageable – and free. Dogs, on the other hand, can also be groomed at home. If this is not something you want to do, ask friends for a referral to an affordable and reputable groomer.

Forbes Living TV also suggests looking for good deals on heartworm pills, flea treatments and the other major preventative items. There are a lot available. Do an Internet search on the topic and find a site which not only offers discounts, but coupons too. Every dollar saved can spent on fun toys for the furry one. 

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Forbes Living Explains How E. Coli Can Be Dangerous to Kids

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Small children and the elderly are at most risk of becoming sick from any one of the strains of E. coli. Forbes Living shares how this bacteria can affect small children and what to do if you think your child may been exposed to it.

It is important to note that kids can get E. coli from a variety of sources such as consuming high-risk foods like undercooked meat, unpasteurized milk or juices, restaurants at which [people with E. coli] have eaten, exposure to live animals, recreational water, and exposure to child care centers.

Children will present symptoms like severe gastrointestinal pain, bloody stools and diarrhea, lack of appetite, shock and maybe even kidney failure. If any one of these symptoms is present, take the child to the nearest emergency room and tell them to test for E. coli. One of the most dangerous medical issues for kids is hemolytic uremic syndrome, which is a complication of E. coli. Red blood cells are destroyed prematurely and clog the blood-filtering system of the kidneys, which can take the life of a small child. Forbes Living TV reminds parents and caretakers that life is precious and the life of a child can be gone so fast.  Always err on the side of caution. It’s better to know than to wonder.

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Forbes Living and the Climbing Cost of Breakfast

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Why is breakfast food like eggs, bacon, coffee and butter getting so expensive? It seems like the most important meal of the day is becoming the priciest meal of the day. Forbes Living looks at the climbing cost of breakfast.

Some parts of the U.S. are going through the worst drought conditions experienced in decades. This results in higher prices for produce and livestock as farmers and cattle owners spend more to keep plants, trees and animals hydrated. Drought conditions produce a reduced amount of product from coffee beans to bacon. And consumers are choosing to eat more protein-rich foods like yogurt for breakfast versus cereals, which contain grains. All of these factors raise the price of traditional breakfast foods. To keep grocery bills from climbing, use coupons, discount codes and price checking apps. Many stores have bar code reading apps which give the shopper a way to find a lower price for a product.

Forbes Living TV also suggests making breakfast at home and taking it on the commute if needed. Make a breakfast sandwich in the microwave and use a thermal mug for hot beverages. Buy a small soft lunch cooler to take yogurt and fruit to work and have it while sorting through email. Let us know if there is a more cost-efficient way you do breakfast every day.

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Forbes Living Visits a Place Where They Ask Tourists to Keep Their Egos Locked Up in Their Luggage

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Forbes Living notes that a few decades ago, there lived a generation whose major claim to fame was being the most self-absorbed group of people the world had ever seen.  By all accounts, those individuals have been bested by the current crop of young people.  Think of them as “The Selfie Generation”.  Of course, part of this phenomenon is the existence of the ubiquitous digital camera, aka, the smart phone, which not only enables them to take pictures anywhere, anytime and without processing and printing costs, but these devices are also engineered to make it easy to snap that all-too-tempting selfie.  So while on vacation or when visiting interesting places or taking in fascinating sights, the tradition is no longer to take a photograph of the stunning scenery … but to take a photograph of your stunning self against the backdrop of the scenery.  It’s obvious from the composition of these shots which one is more important in the photographer’s mind.

Forbes Living notes that one popular tourist destination is trying to eradicate the selfie craze.

The Forbes Living TV show reports that one lush travel destination has done something about it.  La Garoupe, a posh beach in the south of France, has posted notices that selfies, which they refer to as “braggies” will not be tolerated.  No selfies alowed.  They even set up signage declaring the beach a Braggie-Free Zone.  There are also “Holiday Spam Police” patrolling the strand in order to surpress such egotistical behavior.  This initiative will no doubt bring a new level of taste to online social media.  If the beach is attractive, let us see a good picture of the beach, without the photographer dominating 2/3 of the frame.  While no one wants to see the quashing of personal freedoms, this measure will permit the rest of us freedom from these irritating moments of self-worship.

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